Using stickers to enable privacy for kids on PopJam

PopJam is our COPPA and GDPR-K compliant, safe-social content platform built specifically for kids. It’s used by hundreds of brands, content-owners and YouTubers to interact directly with under-13s as an alternative to platforms like Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat (which aren’t designed for kids). Read More

How we scale our kid-safe technology using Kubernetes

At SuperAwesome, we build technology that makes the internet safer for kids. Every month, we handle requests from hundreds of millions of kids located all around the world. These kids use their devices moderately in the morning, a little bit during the day, and a lot in the evening. As a result, we had to build highly scalable systems that would respond automatically to that demand. This post explains how horizontal auto-scaling can be achieved using the tools offered by Kubernetes and its ecosystem (and won’t cover other kinds of auto-scalers like the Vertical Pod Autoscaler). Read More

Kids content creators need another online video platform

Last week I talked about our financials in an interview with Dean Takahashi at Venturebeat. In 2018 SuperAwesome hit a revenue run-rate of $64m. This year we’ll take that same measure to almost $100m. Every month our various kidtech products are powering safe, private digital engagements for over 500m kids as they play games, watch videos and engage with their communities online. Read More

5 things we learned while refining Verifiable Parental Consent for kids apps

Apps and games that need to collect personally identifiable information (PII) from kids require the parents to give their consent. Given the sensitive nature of this information, we take extra measures to make sure that the parent of the child is really the one giving the consent. Under COPPA and GDPR-K, one of the ways to do so is by performing a credit card transaction for a small charge ($1). Here are some of the interesting things we’ve learned while iterating on our parental consent flows: Read More

The #kidtech movement: a zero-data architecture for children’s apps and sites

At SuperAwesome, we spend a lot of time thinking about the requirements for an internet that is now used by vast numbers of children (versus it’s original design, which was solely for adults). GDPR-K is rapidly being followed by new children’s laws in many countries that are based on the same principles -- data minimisation and privacy by design. The #kidtech movement is about eliminating (not just reducing) the risk of kids personal data collection as much as possible. Here’s why we believe that a zero-data internet is the only solution to the growing problem of kids digital privacy online. Read More

What every game developer needs to know about getting parental permissions right

If you’re building a game or app for kids (under-13 in the US or under-16 in Europe), you need to consider how you’re going to manage age gates and parental permissions. Both are essential to ensure compliance with data privacy laws (COPPA and GDPR-K), but both are complex user flows and mismanaging them can create barriers to engagement for your easily-distracted young audiences. Here’s what you need to remember: Read More

5 things game developers need to know about COPPA and GDPR-K

With 170,000 kids going online for the first time every day, developers have to consider them a likely audience for their games, even if they are not deliberately child-directed. Data privacy laws for children such as COPPA (US) and GDPR-K (EU) are now well known, but the lack of clear guidance on how to apply them can make publishing such games difficult and scary for developers. Here are five things to keep in mind if you’re developing apps or sites for a children’s audience OR which might be accessed by children: Read More